Family Matters: 15 Examples for Your Invitation's Host Line

Ephemora’s elegant Flor stationery suite, featuring floral photography and gentle shadows.

(Side note: Isn’t this photo cute? This is co-founder Molly’s gorgeous Aunt Joann and late Grandpa John dancing at Joann’s 1989 wedding. Anyway, onto the blog post!)

We’ve covered the basic structure of a wedding invite on the blog, but we still see lots of questions about one item in particular: the host line. This is a nuanced subject, so it’s totally understandable that you could use some extra specific help! Let’s dive into the nitty gritty...

First, some housekeeping: you’ve probably heard that it’s traditional for a bride’s name to come before a groom’s on the invite. Traditionally the bride’s family pays for the wedding. If that is the case in your wedding, that’s excellent! But not every wedding involves a bride and groom, and we remain unconvinced that the honor of being included on a wedding invite is exclusive to whomever is footing the bill. Ephemora is hereby empowering you to put your and your future spouse’s names in whichever order is meaningful to you, and to base your decision for which family you include on your invitation on personal preference (and maybe the desires of your family, if that’s appropriate for your situation), and not on unspoken financial obligations.

Some case-studies:

One set of parents is hosting:

Junelle and Richard Raymond
invite you to celebrate
the marriage of their child/daughter/son
Dallas
to
River Matthews…

Both sets of parents are hosting:

Junelle and Richard Raymond
together with Kate Matthews
invite you to celebrate the marriage of their children,
Dallas
and
River...

Seina & Phoebe are using the Marbles suite and hosting their own wedding. Doesn’t it look fun??

Seina & Phoebe are using the Marbles suite and hosting their own wedding. Doesn’t it look fun??

You are hosting your own wedding:

Please join
Dallas Raymond
and
River Matthews
in celebration of our marriage…

Dallas Raymond
and
River Matthews
invite you to celebrate their union…

Join us for the wedding of
Dallas Raymond
and
River Matthews

You are hosting your own wedding, alongside various family members:

Together with their parents,
Dallas Raymond
and
River Matthews
invite you to a marriage celebration…

Together with our families,
we invite you to celebrate our wedding!
Dallas Raymond
and
River Matthews…

Dallas
and
River
along with our parents,
Junelle and Richard Raymond
Kate Matthews
invite you to a wedding celebration…

 
Miao & Peter’s parents are probably friends. Or at least, they tolerate each other enough to co-host a wedding.

Miao & Peter’s parents are probably friends. Or at least, they tolerate each other enough to co-host a wedding.

 

Divorced parents are hosting:

The word “and” in the host line is used to imply partnership. If your parents are divorced, one option is to simply leave out the “and”:

Junelle Raymond
Richard Raymond
invite you to celebrate…

Alternatively, use “along with,” “alongside,” or “together with,” as these don’t imply a partnership:

Junelle Raymond
along with
Richard Raymond
invite you to celebrate…

If your parents are divorced and one or more of them has new partners:

Junelle Raymond and Dwayne Campbell
together with
Richard Raymond and Wendy Raymond
invite you to celebrate…

Regardless of whether or not your parents’ new partners were a part of your upbringing, these host lines would be followed by “the wedding of their child/daughter/son, Dallas” and so on. If you would like to honor these folks by including them on your invite in this way, it’s understood that they have an important place in your life. Alternatively, you could avoid a statement of relationship entirely by following “invite you to celebrate” with simply “the wedding of Dallas” and so on. If you are non-binary or gender non-conforming, this has the added benefit of avoiding being referred to as the somewhat diminutive “child” (in place of daughter/son).

It’s totally valid if one or more of these folks is someone you are not close with or do not wish to include on your invitations, regardless of their association with family members whom you would like to include. It’s totally okay in this case to leave them off if that feels right to you:

Junelle Raymond and Dwayne Campbell
together with
Richard Raymond
invite you to celebrate…

A parent is deceased:

If you’d like to refer to your family by name, but would rather avoid having to mention the name of your late relative:

The Raymond family
invites you to celebrate the marriage of
Dallas
to
River Matthews

If you would like to refer to your late relative by name, you would write their names after yours:

You are invited to celebrate the wedding of
River Matthews
child/daughter/son of Kate Matthews and the late Dr. Jackson Matthews
to
Dallas Raymond…

Junelle Raymond and Dwayne Campbell
together with
Richard Raymond
invite you to celebrate the wedding of
Dallas
to
River
child/daughter/son of Kate Matthews and the late Dr. Jackson Matthews…


Now that you have a better understanding of whose names go where and why, you can mix-and-match these examples to customize a host line that’s meaningful to you and your family. Is your situation even more unique than we could predict? Reach out! Ephemora works one-on-one with our customers to get your invitation suite wording just right.


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